Total Pageviews

Thursday, 24 January 2019

Diabetes and Cold Feet : Some Possible Causes and Treatment



"We’ve all heard of a bride or groom “getting cold feet” before walking down the aisle, but for people with diabetes, having cold feet takes on another meaning entirely. 

What causes cold feet?
1. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a form of nerve damage, is one of the most common causes of cold feet. About sixty to seventy percent of people with diabetes develop some form of neuropathy over time. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is actually the cause of all kinds of symptoms, including tingling, burning, or sensitivity to touch. Your feet might seem warm to the touch, but feel cold to you. Symptoms may worsen at night.
2. Poor circulation is another common cause of cold feet. Poor circulation makes it more challenging for your heart to pump warm blood to your extremities, keeping your feet cooler than the rest of your body.
3. Peripheral artery disease, caused by clogged arteries in your legs, can reduce circulation and lead to cold feet. This could be a sign of something more serious, like increased risk for heart attack or stroke, but your doctor can usually detect it by checking the pulse in your legs.
4. Certain medications, particularly those that cause blood vessels to constrict, can cause cold feet. Popular medications associated with cold feet are those to treat blood pressure, migraine headaches, and head colds. Talk to your pharmacist if you start to experience cold feet after starting a particular medication.

5. Hypothyroidism is a condition caused by an underactive thyroid. Low levels of thyroid hormone interfere with your body’s metabolism, contributing to reduced circulation and colder feet. 

Other causes of cold feet
Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a neurological disorder that causes funny sensations in your legs when at rest, such as creeping, crawling, aching—and, sometimes, cold sensations on the skin of your legs that can be relieved by moving them.
Tarsal tunnel syndrome, a type of nerve disease caused by compression of the nerves in the ankle and foot. This is more common in people with diabetes than the general population.
Raynaud’s phenomenon, in which blood vessels spasm and restrict blood flow to your extremities. 

How can cold feet be treated?
Prevention is the best treatment. People with diabetes can have a decreased capacity for healing, especially in the feet. And because of this, the risk of amputation increases. Use the following tips to warm up and prevent damage to your feet:
1. Keep your surroundings at a comfortable temperature. This varies from person to person. Room temperature is considered 20°C (68 °F) to 28°C (82.4 °F).
2. Avoid going barefoot, both inside and outside.
3. Wear well-fitting socks and shoes for every occasion. Wear shoes with faux fur, fur, or sheepskin lining. Remember to make sure the sole of your shoe is hard enough that a tack wouldn’t go through it.
4. Avoid hot water bottles, electric heaters, electric blankets, heated socks and shoes, and hot baths. These can burn your skin, and you may not know it until it’s too late, especially if you have neuropathy.
5. Check your feet regularly for blisters, cuts, wounds, or other troubling changes. If you notice anything, talk to your healthcare provider to prevent things from getting worse.
6. If you experience frostbite, elevate your feet, and keep them clean, dry, and covered. Contact your healthcare provider right away. This can be a medical emergency.

Talk with your healthcare provider about other causes of cold feet, such as RLS, circulation problems, hypothyroidism, or medications."

Words and picture from an article at 'dlife', please see their article with all relevant links here

All the best Jan

29 comments:

dlkgzr said...

Hi, Im a new follower on your blog from gfc ...
I hope you will be back ...
www.dlkgzr.com

Author R. Mac Wheeler said...


new stuff to worry about :(

Valerie-Jael said...

Some important information. Valerie

NCmountainwoman said...

I have persistent neuropathy in my toes and the distal thirds of my feet from my chemotherapy. Makes my feet cold all the time. I found LL Bean's wicked good slipper lined with wool help a lot when I'm inside. Thanks for the tips.

Tom said...

...colorful way the keep them warm.

The Happy Whisk said...

I have Raynauds and that's in my hands and the hands turn corpse white from it. Not fun. And, if can happen during a hot summer day, just by touching something very, very cold. We call it, turning. As in, turning into a corpse.

Sandra Cox said...

Interesting article. I have always had cold feet in bed.

mxtodis123 said...

Very good info to have. I've been pre-diabetic for years. My hubby, too, but due to one of his lung medications, he recently became diabetic.

Miss Val's Creations said...

Great information. I have always suffered from cold extremities (feet, hands and nose) but not entirely sure why. Likely poor circulation. I bundle up in clothes and turn up the heat when needed. We moved 1000 miles south which is helping me with comfort too.

Out on the prairie said...

interesting to read, I never thought of burning cold feet.

Missy George said...

I have Raynauds and spinal stenosis. Both my feet are superficially numb and cold to the touch but they don't feel cult. Some tangling. Good article

Elephant's Child said...

I have peripheral neuropathy, but no cold feet. And in our current weather I would welcome that manifestation.

Carla from The River said...

Great info.. I have a dear friend who is dietetic. I am going to pass this on to her.
Carla

Christine said...

Thanks for this information. Wearing socks in winter helps everyone!

Snowbird said...

Some useful information here!xxx

A Casa Madeira said...

Good sharing.
Good continuation of the end of the month.

Kim said...

Jan, this is perfect timing. We have several in the family with Raynaud's and thyroid issues. Cold feet are a constant issue. I'm actually wearing two pairs of slippers at the moment. I need well fitting socks. Never thought of that. Thanks!!

Betsy said...

My dad was diabetic and my blood sugar on high end. Good information to be had from your posts.

Thank you for visiting my site and comment. We will be spending two nights in Va. Beach, not my favorite beach mainly because I love seashells and glass and not either one I've found here, well yet anyway..The sound of the waves I love in the evening especially and the walks even in the cold that is comforting to me. You are so right, there is something wondrous about walks on the beach.
Betsy

sandy said...

That's informative - thanks.

Margaret-whiteangel said...

Interesting read Jan.
Lucky I have always got hot feet even in our temperate winter, so for me always sandals and no socks.

Linda said...

Did you see the study saying that metformin may deplete vitamin B12?

Teresa said...

Gracias por esté reportaje, me interesa mucho. Besitos.

DIMI said...

Hello Jan!
Interesting article and very important information!
Thank you for sharing! Have a lovely day and a happy weekend!
Dimi...

Ygraine said...

A really informative post...thank you so much!
As a sufferer of Raynaud's, I am always being plagued by cold feet...and these tips will be invaluable to me.😊😊
I love those cool socks!!

Have a great weekend.

Pam Jackson said...

Nothing more fun then sticking cold feet under the covers and touching someone you love!! haha...I have Raynauds...seems to go hand in hand with Fibromyalgia. Nice fluffy thick warm socks are the best.

Lowcarb team member said...

Linda said...
Did you see the study saying that metformin may deplete vitamin B12?

Hello Linda, many thanks for your comment and question.
Yes, Metformin can cause vitamin B12 deficiency which may also give rise to neuropathy symptoms. Husband Eddie, who is a Type 2 Diabetic, has regular blood tests for this, and is certainly to be recommended if a person takes metformin.

All the best Jan

A Brit in Tennessee said...

My feet stay cold, and numb and tingling, made worse by two different surgeries on both of my ankles. However I tend to think my under active thyroid, and also taking blood pressure medicine are the main culprits.
Thank you for enlightening me !
~Jo

William Kendall said...

My mother had that periodically.

Magic Love Crow said...

Excellent post Jan! Thank you! Big Hugs!