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Thursday, 17 October 2019

Lemon Blueberry Pound Cake : Low Carb and Gluten Free


You may have already seen some of Lisa MarcAurele's recipes on Diet Doctor site, she also has a blog called Low Carb Yum. This recipe suggestion is by Lisa and she says; "not only is this a gorgeous looking Bundt cake, it’s got a great texture and isn’t dry. The flavour is terrific too. I bet no one will be able to tell it’s a low carb and gluten free treat!" Best to use a silicone Bundt pan, but if you do use an older cast iron Bundt pan, spray it with non-stick spray, then let it cool in the pan for 20 to 30 minutes before turning it out. It should then come right out, and doesn’t stick at all!

INGREDIENTS:
Serves 16
CAKE:
1 cup butter softened
8 ounces cream cheese
1 cup low carb sugar substitute or Sukrin:1 (I used 3/4 cup)
1/2 teaspoon stevia concentrated powder or another 1/2 cup Swerve or Sukrin:1
10 eggs
2 teaspoons lemon extract
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
2 1/4 cups almond flour
1/2 cup coconut flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 cups blueberries
2 tablespoons coconut flour
GLAZE:
1/2 cup Swerve Confectioners Powdered Sweetener or Sukrin Melis

2-3 tablespoons lemon juice
NUTRITION:
Serving: 1 slice
Carbohydrates 9g  Fibre 4g  (Net Carbs 5g) Protein 9g  Fat 27g
INSTRUCTIONS:
with more tips and a step-by-step guide can be seen here 




Related Helpful Guides/Articles:
Keto Sweeteners & Low Carb Sugar Substitutes here
'The Ultimate Guide To Low Carb Flours', which I'm sure many readers will find both interesting and helpful, is here
Weight & Measurement conversion charts here

Did you know:
Blueberries, not only are they delicious and nutritious but they also have one of the highest antioxidant levels amongst all fruits, vegetables, spices and seasonings.

Blueberries are low in carbs and therefore do not have a significant impact on blood glucose levels, making them a good choice for diabetics.

Blueberries can also be frozen without reducing any of their antioxidant properties or delicate structure. So pick up those on offer in the supermarket and get them in the freezer ... now that's a good idea!

We bring a variety of articles, studies etc. plus recent news/views and recipe ideas to this blog, we hope something for everyone to read and enjoy. Please note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Wednesday, 16 October 2019

I thought it was funny.


Eddie

Beef Enchiladas : Low Carb


Lisa MarcAurele says "Hold the flour tortillas! There's no need for them with these tasty low-carb beef enchiladas. Instead, the beef mixture is wrapped in sliced deli meat chicken or turkey breast and then topped with grated cheese, a quick homemade enchilada sauce, and slices of jalapeño."

Ingredients:
Serves Four
10g carbs per serving
Sauce
2 tbsp. chili powder
1 tsp ground cumin
15 oz. (425g) unsweetened tomato sauce
½ tsp garlic powder
¼ tsp salt
Enchiladas
1 lb (450g) ground beef
3 oz. (75g) cauliflower, riced
1 oz. (30g) red onions, finely chopped
1 tbsp. chili powder
1 tsp ground cumin
½ tsp onion powder
½ tsp garlic powder
¼ tsp salt
½ cup (125ml) water
8 oz. (225g) deli chicken breast*
4 oz. (110g) Mexican cheese, shredded/grated
Toppings
pickled jalapeños

¼ cup (60ml) sour cream
Tips
Smaller rolls can be made by using only one slice of deli-chicken breast per roll. 

Sliced deli turkey breast* can be used in place of chicken.
Instructions:
Can be seen here

Did you know that Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times. The people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate corn tortillas folded or rolled around small fish. It is believed the creation of the enchilada is at the very minimum of the 1500s, but likely goes back thousands of years prior to that. The first written documentation that explicitly discusses enchiladas happens to also be the first cookbook published in Mexico, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”). This was produced in 1831.
More about Enchilada's here and here

There is a "veggie enchiladas" recipe here but please note it is not low carb!


We bring a variety of recipe ideas, and articles, to this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Nutrition Wars ... Putting Science First !


This article from Diet Doctor site:
Bret Scher, MD FACC writes:
"Nutrition wars on social media may be at an all-time high. That isn’t a scientific fact, but it sure feels like it. 

“My side is right.” “Your side is killing people.” The hyperbole and the rhetoric seem unprecedented. It has gone well beyond science into personal attacks, criminal accusations, and emotion-filled tirades. 

The recent escalation was kicked-off by a recent series of studies published in the prestigious journal Annals of Internal Medicine suggesting that high-quality science does not support lowering our intake of red meat. This finding is supported by both prospective and observational studies published in peer reviewed journals. It is backed by science. 

Yet, the recent publications was met with cries of fraud, deception and outright harm. Those who staunchly defend vegan and vegetarian diets as the only path to health and salvation attacked these studies and called for their retraction. 

Their retraction! It is as if the authors were fabricating the data or were purposefully deceiving the public. 

That’s just not the case. These were scientific studies. The authors carefully graded the quality of the research. They explained their scientific methods. They focused on an individual perspective and downgraded science that has extremely weak associations. They were upfront and transparent about their process. There was no fraud. There was no deception. 

But why the strong, hateful response? It’s because some would rather accept poorly controlled observational data with very weak associations that support their beliefs than data that has been adjusted for strength and quality and does not support their beliefs. 

And while I am at it, why the strong rejection by some that carbohydrate restriction can be an effective therapy for obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome? Again, the science supports it. There is no fabrication. There is no fraud. 

Why do some claim loudly that those promoting low carb are criminals who are killing people? 

Do some in the low-carb world claim a little too loudly that low-carb is the only way? Do some shout about its many benefits, some backed by research and some not? 

Yes, they do. That is part of human nature and, I have news for you, the same can be said about vegan and vegetarian advocates. Yet somehow those advocating for plant-based diets don’t get quite the same rebuke. 

In fact, if anyone has been promoting the “one diet for everyone” message, it is those promoting a vegan diet for all. 

Low carb, on the other hand, does not discriminate. Low-carb can exist with a vegan, vegetarian, omnivore, or carnivore twist. Low carb doesn’t discriminate, and it is backed by science. Just reduce your carbs in a manner that you can sustain, and you will improve your blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. 

The science backs that up. 

Can you achieve those goals by other means? Of course you can. 

Does everyone have uniform success with low carb or with other means? Of course not. 

Before I dwell too long about the failings of social media and nutrition science, in comes Dr. David Ludwig with a new article responding to prior critique of his work with poise. 


Dr. Ludwig, a Harvard researcher and endocrinologist, published a paper last year showing that those following a low-carb diet, post-weight loss, burned an average of 200-280 additional calories per day compared to those on a higher-carb diet. (Here is a link to our Diet Doctor podcast that was recorded just before the study was published, and an article we wrote shortly after it was published). Some, most notably researcher Dr. Kevin Hall, criticized the methods Dr. Ludwig used. 

Did Dr. Ludwig strike back with personal attacks? Did he call his critics “zealots” or simply dismiss their rebukes? Not at all. Instead, he made all his data publicly available and essentially said, “Here it is; let’s have a constructive discussion about this and one of two things will happen. Either my methods will be shown to be inaccurate, or they won’t.” Either way, the winner in the end is science. I believe a belief in science is why Ludwig does what he does. He is not trying to prove his self-worth by being “right.” He hopes to promote good science, ultimately to help people improve their lives. 

I am not sure what to make of the nutrition wars. (I dislike military analogies, but I am afraid this one seems fitting.) But I know this for sure. It is time to recognize the scientifically proven benefits for low-carb nutrition. It is time to recognize carbohydrate restriction as a powerful, proven tool to help people improve their health. 

Advocates for low carb are not hurting people. They are promoting an evidence-based diet now recognized by the American Diabetes Association as the most effective therapy for glucose regulation. This should be a tool in the tool box of every physician. If our goal is to reverse our current obesity and diabetes epidemics, we have to use carb restriction as a tool in the right circumstances. While we are at it, we have to get away from the dogma that there is one way to treat all people. 

Can we do that and be civil to one another? After all, it isn’t about us. It never was. It is about the millions of people who need our help."

Thanks for reading,


Related Articles:
The science of low carb and keto - read it here
You may also like to read 'Introduction to low-carb for beginners' see it here

All the best Jan

Tuesday, 15 October 2019

Tuesday Trio : Low Carb Recipe Suggestions !

This Tuesday Trio of lower carb recipe suggestions definitely has more of a vegetarian / vegan theme ... but even for meat eaters, it does sometimes make a change to have a veggie night!

The first one in this Tuesday's mix is a healthy salad that can be enjoyed any day of the week.

Caramelised onion, cheese and hazelnut salad


Ingredients
Serves 8
( 7.4g carbohydrate per serving )
1 tbsp. olive oil
4 medium red onions, sliced
2 yellow peppers, washed, de-seeded and thinly sliced
50 g blanched hazelnuts
1 tbsp. white wine vinegar
1 tsp Dijon mustard
2 tsp clear honey
100 g mix of watercress, spinach & rocket salad
125 g Abergavenny goats cheese (or similar), crumbled
Instructions
can be seen here

The second one is a 'Greek Style' style dish, so called because of the herbs and feta used,
you can read more about feta cheese here. 

Greek Style Roasted Mushrooms with Red Pepper, Herbs and Feta


Ingredients
low carb dish, makes about four servings
4 T extra virgin olive oil
2 T fresh mint, finely chopped
2 T fresh oregano, finely chopped (Other fresh herbs of your choice could be used.)
3 T fresh lemon juice (or less if you’re not a big lemon fan)
12 oz. jar roasted red pepper, drained well and diced into small pieces
1 pound fresh white or brown mushrooms
1/3 cup crumbled Feta cheese
salt, fresh ground black pepper to taste
Instructions
can be seen here

Finally in this 'Tuesday Trio' of recipes is a fresh and delicious Vegetarian / Vegan dish

Tomato Curry


Ingredients
Serves Four
900g large vine tomatoes
3 tbsp. vegetable oil
2 thinly sliced garlic cloves
2 tbsp. grated ginger
1 thinly sliced onion
1 de-seeded and chopped red chilli
1 tsp lightly crushed fennel seeds
1⁄2 tsp paprika
1⁄2 tsp turmeric
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp tomato purée
12 curry leaves
100ml hot water
fresh coriander to serve
Instructions
can be seen here

I hope you've enjoyed this 'Tuesday Trio'. I wonder have you a favourite looking recipe out of these three? I do enjoy the mix of flavours in the second recipe! 

Dear reader, you will find a variety of recipe ideas within this blog. Please note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Monday, 14 October 2019

Lamb Chops - How To Cook Them !

" Lamb chops and steaks should be cooked over a high heat, quickly, and can be quick-roasted, too, depending on how thick they are. Barbecuing, griddling, pan-frying and grilling are all methods that suit chops with an aim to getting lots of colour on the meat and any exposed fat sizzling until brown.
Chops are quick to cook and easy to portion but they differ depending on which part of the lamb they come from. 

One-pan glazed rack of lamb with spiced red onions & potatoes
recipe here

Lamb chops and steaks

Rack of lamb – This is a trimmed rack of six chops that can either be roasted whole and carved into chops, or cut into cutlets (see below) that can then be quick-cooked.

Lamb cutlets – Taken from the rack of lamb, these neat chops can come with a layer of fat surrounding the eye of the meat that extends to the bone, or they can be French-trimmed to expose the bone. These can be simply pan-fried, griddled or quickly barbecued and sometimes find their way into a casserole.

Lamb lollipops – This is a well-trimmed cutlet that has had the eye of the meat batted out.

Loin chops – Cut from the saddle, these meaty chops have a T-shaped bone in the middle which is so thick the meat is quickly roasted.

Barnsley chops – A double loin chop (see above). A single Barnsley chop is the perfect portion for one.

Chump/rump chops – A boneless slice of the chump, these are very good value and can be pan-fried or barbecued like a steak. 

Leg steaks – A cross-section of the leg, these steaks can vary in size and normally have a piece of bone in the middle that the marrow can be eaten out of once cooked. A great steak to barbecue. 

Lamb lollipops with smashed minty broad beans
recipe here

Flavour friends 

Lamb chops and steaks take well to being marinated. Here are some classic flavours from around the world to include in marinades and rubs, either all together or in different combinations:

British – capers, rosemary and/or thyme, or served with redcurrant jelly or mint sauce
Mediterranean – garlic, olives, anchovies, lemon, basil
North African – cinnamon, saffron, chilli, cumin
Indian – cinnamon, turmeric, coriander, ginger, lime, cumin, curry paste, garam marsala, yogurt"

Rosemary roast lamb chops
recipe here

Want to know more about lamb! There's lots more to read about this great meat, including a variety of recipes - please click on the link and scroll through here

Dear reader, this blog is presented in a magazine style - we hope something for everyone. You will find a variety of articles, studies, thoughts, photographs, music and recipes! However, not all the recipes ideas featured in this blog may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter. 

All the best Jan

"Dogs are more effective than statins" !


image from here

Dog Ownership and Survival: 

Abstract
Background:
Dog ownership has been associated with decreased cardiovascular risk. Recent reports have suggested an association of dog companionship with lower blood pressure levels, improved lipid profile, and diminished sympathetic responses to stress. However, it is unclear if dog ownership is associated with improved survival as previous studies have yielded inconsistent results. Thus, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the association of dog ownership with all-cause mortality, with and without prior cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular mortality.

Methods and Results:
Studies published between 1950 and May 24, 2019 were identified by searching Embase and PubMed. Observational studies that evaluated baseline dog ownership and subsequent all-cause mortality or cardiovascular mortality. Two independent reviewers extracted the data. We assessed pooled data using random-effects model. A possible limitation was that the analyses were not adjusted for confounders. Ten studies were included yielding data from 3 837 005 participants (530 515 events; mean follow-up 10.1 years). Dog ownership was associated with a 24% risk reduction for all-cause mortality as compared to non-ownership (relative risk, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67–0.86) with 6 studies demonstrating significant reduction in the risk of death. Notably, in individuals with prior coronary events, living in a home with a dog was associated with an even more pronounced risk reduction for all-cause mortality (relative risk, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.17–0.69; I2, 0%). Moreover, when we restricted the analyses to studies evaluating cardiovascular mortality, dog ownership conferred a 31% risk reduction for cardiovascular death (relative risk, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.67–0.71; I2, 5.1%).

Conclusions:
Dog ownership is associated with lower risk of death over the long term, which is possibly driven by a reduction in cardiovascular mortality.



WHAT IS KNOWN
  • Dog ownership has been associated with decreased cardiovascular risk. A series of studies has suggested associations of dog ownership with lower blood pressure levels, improved lipid profile, and diminished sympathetic responses to stress.
  • The evidence regarding dog ownership and mortality has yielded conflicting results. Whereas the association between dog ownership and mortality has been explored since the 1980s, living in a home with a dog has been associated with improved survival in some studies with others arguing a neutral effect.
WHAT THE STUDY ADDS
  • Pooling the data of 3 837 005 participants, dog ownership was associated with a 24% risk reduction for all-cause mortality as compared to non-ownership (relative risk, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.67–0.86).
  • In analyses of studies evaluating cardiovascular mortality, dog ownership conferred a 31% risk reduction for cardiovascular death (relative risk, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.67–0.71; I2, 5.1%).
  • Dog ownership is associated with lower risk of death over the long term, which is possibly driven by a reduction in cardiovascular mortality. These results hold implications for future studies on lifestyle interventions.

More to read here

Image credit: Brian Muccioli

Related Post
Ways That Having a Pet Can Help Your Diabetes - read it here 


All the best Jan

Sunday, 13 October 2019

Football a very serious matter.

"Some people think football is a matter of life and death. I don't like that attitude. I can assure them it is much more serious" Bill Shankly


Eddie

Saturday, 12 October 2019

Eva Cassidy - Danny Boy

Many have recorded this song, but for tonight's Saturday Night Music, it's the wonderful version from Eva Cassidy.  I hope you enjoy. All the best Jan

Baked Eggs ... so low carb !


Anne Aobadia says, this is a perfect 'low-carb marriage' of eggs and beef! You can 'whip up' this tasty gem anytime ... for breakfast, for lunch, dinner or supper … just tuck in!

Ingredients
Serves One
3 oz. ground (minced) beef or ground lamb or ground pork, use left-overs or cook it any way you like. You can also use this recipe.
2 eggs

2 oz. shredded/grated cheese

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C) (Gas Mark 6).
2. Arrange cooked ground-beef mixture in a small baking dish. Then make two holes with a spoon and crack the eggs into them.
3. Sprinkle shredded/grated cheese on top.
4. Bake in the oven until the eggs are done, about 10-15 minutes.
5. Let cool for a while. The eggs and ground meat get very hot!

Tip 

Why not pair it with a crisp, crunchy, green salad with fresh herbs and avocado. Or try it with this homemade mayonnaise


Eggs have many Health Benefits,
read more here

Talking eggs, have you tried this vegetarian low carb/keto Breakfast Casserole,
see more details here


Dear reader; a variety of articles and recipe ideas are found within this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Friday, 11 October 2019

Healthiest Types of Cheese

Lizzie Streit, MS, RDN, LD writes:
"Cheese is a dairy product that comes in hundreds of different textures and flavours.

It’s produced by adding acid or bacteria to milk from various farm animals, then aging or processing the solid parts of the milk.

The nutrition and taste of cheese depend on how it is produced and what milk is used.

Some people are concerned that cheese is high in fat, sodium, and calories. However, cheese is also an excellent source of protein, calcium, and several other nutrients.

Eating cheese may even aid weight loss and help prevent heart disease and osteoporosis. That said, some cheeses are healthier than others.

Here are nine of the healthiest types of cheese.



Mozzarella 
Mozzarella is a soft, white cheese with high moisture content. It originated in Italy and is usually made from Italian buffalo or cow’s milk.
Summary: Mozzarella is a soft cheese that’s lower in sodium and calories than most other cheeses. It also contains probiotics that may boost your immune system.

Blue Cheese 
Blue cheese is made from cow, goat, or sheep’s milk that has been cured with cultures from the mold Penicillium. 
Summary: Blue cheese has distinctive blue or grey veins and a tangy taste. Loaded with calcium, it may promote bone health and help prevent osteoporosis.

Feta
Feta is a soft, salty, white cheese originally from Greece. It’s typically made from sheep’s or goat’s milk. Sheep’s milk gives feta a tangy and sharp taste, while goat’s feta is milder.

Summary: Feta is a Greek cheese that’s higher in salt but lower in calories than other cheeses. It may also contain higher amounts of CLA, a fatty acid linked to improved body composition.


Greek salad with feta - more to read here

Cottage Cheese 
Cottage cheese is a soft, white cheese made from the loose curds of cow’s milk. It’s thought to have originated in the United States.
Summary: Cottage cheese is a fresh, clumpy cheese that’s loaded with protein. Adding cottage cheese to your diet can help keep you full and may aid weight loss. 

Ricotta
Ricotta is an Italian cheese made from the watery parts of cow, goat, sheep, or Italian water buffalo milk that are left over from making other cheeses. Ricotta has a creamy texture and is often described as a lighter version of cottage cheese.
Summary: Ricotta is a creamy, white cheese that’s loaded with protein. The high-quality whey found in ricotta may promote muscle growth and help lower blood pressure.

Parmesan 
Parmesan is a hard, aged cheese that has a gritty texture and a salty, nutty flavour. It’s made from raw, unpasteurized cow’s milk that’s aged for at least 12 months to kill harmful bacteria and produce a complex flavour.
Summary: Parmesan is a low-lactose cheese that’s high in calcium and phosphorus, which may promote bone health.

Swiss 
As the name suggests, Swiss cheese originated in Switzerland. This semi-hard cheese is normally made from cow’s milk and features a mild, nutty taste. Its signature holes are formed by bacteria that release gases during the fermentation process.
Summary: Swiss cheese has less fat and sodium than most other cheeses and offers compounds that may help lower blood pressure. However, more research is needed.

Cheddar 
Cheddar is a widely popular semi-hard cheese from England. Made from cow’s milk that has been matured for several months, it can be white, off-white, or yellow. The taste of cheddar depends on the variety, ranging from mild to extra sharp (mature).
Summary: Cheddar is rich in vitamin K2, a nutrient that prevents calcium from building up in your arteries and veins. Getting enough K2 may decrease your risk of heart disease.

Cheddar - a classic cheese - read more here

Goat 
Goat cheese, also known as chèvre, is a tangy, soft cheese made from goat’s milk. It’s available in several forms, including spreadable logs, crumbles, and varieties made to resemble Brie. 
Summary: Goat cheese is lower in lactose and contains proteins that may be more easily digested than those in cheeses from cow’s milk.

The Bottom Line 
Cheese is a widely consumed dairy product. Most cheeses are a good source of protein and calcium, and some offer additional health benefits. In particular, certain cheeses may provide nutrients that promote gut health, aid weight loss, improve bone health, and decrease your risk of heart disease. However, as some cheese can be high in sodium and/or fat, it’s still worth keeping an eye on your intake. Overall, cheese can be a nutritious addition to a healthy, balanced diet."





The above words are just a snippet from Lizzie's post, please read it in full here

Regular readers will know that a variety of articles/recipes are within this blog. It is important to note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Thursday, 10 October 2019

Cottage Pie ... this version is creamy and low carb !


This Low-Carb Creamy Cottage Pie tastes so good you will never guess the recipe is low-carb! This Low-Carb Creamy Cottage Pie recipe makes warm, comforting meal that’s perfect for fall and winter. It’s easy enough for a weekday dinner, but inviting enough to serve to company. Everyone will think that the topping is mashed potatoes, but it’s not. Instead, it’s made from mashed celeriac. Celeriac, or celery root stands in as a dead ringer for the mashed potatoes in traditional cottage pie. Celeriac is a weird looking vegetable, perhaps the unsung hero of the vegetable world! It's knobbly, odd-shaped and has a subtle, celery-like flavour … it's also low carb and a favourite in our house. 

This Low-Carb Creamy Cottage Pie is a recipe that the whole family will love, whether low-carb, or not. It can be assembled ahead and kept in the refrigerator overnight, covered. When you’re ready for a quick meal, just bring to room temperature, then bake as directed. Enjoy!

Ingredients:
Serves Eight
For the topping:
1 large celeriac about 16 ounces, peeled and chopped
1 teaspoon sea salt quantity divided
1 clove garlic
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper freshly ground
1 1/4 cup cheddar cheese grated, quantity divided
2 tablespoons sour cream
For the filling:
1 pound ground (minced) beef
sea salt
black pepper freshly ground
4 ounces red onion (about 1/2 medium) diced
1/4 cup carrots finely chopped
1 clove garlic crushed
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
1/2 cup heavy (double) cream
1/2 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons chives quantity divided, sliced
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon black pepper freshly ground
1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Instructions:
1. Preheat oven to 375º F 190º C gas mark 5. Prepare a 9 X 9 inch baking pan by greasing with butter or coconut oil.

For the topping:
1. Place celeriac in a large saucepan. Add about 1/2 teaspoon salt (reserving the other 1/2 teaspoon). Cover celeriac with cold water. Cover saucepan tightly and put over high heat. Bring to a boil, then turn heat to low. Simmer until celeriac is tender--about 10 minutes.
2. While celeriac is cooking, place garlic, butter, thyme, 1/2 teaspoon salt, pepper, 1 cup of cheese (reserving 1/4 cup), and sour cream in a food processor. 
3. When celeriac is tender, drain and discard the cooking water. Add celeriac to the other ingredients in the food processor. Pulse until creamy. Taste and adjust seasoning.
For the filling:
1. Heat a large skillet (frying pan) over medium-high heat.* When hot, add ground beef. Season lightly with salt and pepper.
2. Cook beef, stirring occasionally until all sides begin to brown. Using a slotted spoon, remove beef to a plate. Discard all but 1 tablespoon of the grease from the pan. Place skillet (frying pan) over medium heat.
3. Add onion and carrots to the skillet (frying pan). Cook, stirring occasionally carrot is tender and onion is beginning to brown on the edges and appears translucent.
4. Stir in garlic. Cook one minute. Add vinegar. cook, scraping up browned bits, until vinegar has almost completely evaporated.
5. Stir in thyme, sour cream and heavy (double) cream. Allow to simmer until thickened. Stir in 1 tablespoon chives (reserving 1 tablespoon for later). Add the cooked ground beef to the mixture and stir to combine.
To assemble:
1. Spoon the ground beef mixture into the prepared pan. Spread the celeriac mixture on top. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 cup cheese.
2. Bake in preheated oven for 30-40 minutes or until bubbly in the middle and top has started to brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool 10-15 minutes before serving.

3. Sprinkle reserved 1 tablespoon chives over the top before serving.

Recipe Notes:
*If using low-fat beef, you may need to use a non-stick skillet (frying pan) or melt a tablespoon of butter in the pan to prevent sticking.
Cauliflower can be used in place of celeriac ... it will still be low carb
Ground (minced) Chicken could be used if preferred

Nutrition per serving:
Serving size: 1/8th of the recipe
Fat (g): 25  Net Carbs (g): 6 Protein (g): 18
Need help with weight/measurement conversion:
see here
From original idea here

I hope you may give this recipe suggestion a try ... we bring a variety of recipe ideas to this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.


All the best Jan

Wednesday, 9 October 2019

Goat Cheese, oven baked with blackberries and roasted pistachios : Low Carb : Keto


Simply Wow! This delicious oven-baked goat cheese dish does wow, as an appetizer or a dessert. But it is so tasty and nutritious you could even have it for lunch with a good salad! Yum!

Serves Four
4g carb per serving
Ingredients
20 oz. (550g) goat cheese
Blackberry sauce
9 oz. (250g) fresh blackberries
1 tbsp. erythritol (optional)
1 pinch ground cinnamon
Topping
4 tbsp. pistachio nuts
salt

fresh rosemary
Instructions
can be seen here
Tips
1. Blackberries are so tasty and sweet that you may not need any sweetener, especially when combined with the cinnamon.
2. Pistachios are a good source of protein, healthy fat and fibre, as well as antioxidant and minerals. About 50 pistachios have about 5 grams of net carbs, and are an especially good source for vitamin B6 and potassium. Shelled, raw pistachios can be bought in bulk and are perfect for toasting in this recipe, if you do not want to shell your own.
3.
Goat cheese comes in many varieties and ages. The best goat cheese for warming or roasting are the "semi-ripened" varieties, sometimes labelled soft-ripened goat cheese or semi-aged goat cheese. It has a very light rind on the outside and soft centre.



In recent years, thanks to an increasing taste for goats’ milk products, many British versions have come onto the market – they are particularly common in Wales. The younger cheeses may be flavoured with herbs, pepper or fruit and spread like pâté, and older hard cheeses can be eaten in much the same way as Cheddar. Some people who have an intolerance to cows’ milk may find goats’ milk cheeses easier to digest 


Buyer's guide:
Goats’ cheeses should always be white on the inside, with none of the yellowness common to cows’ milk cheeses. If you’re worried about the pungent flavour that some goats’ cheeses can have, look for young, soft, creamy curd cheeses instead. Due to the number of varieties, goats’ cheese is available year-round, but some, such as Banon from South East France, are best in the summer. 
More information about goat cheese can be found here and here

I hope you may give this recipe suggestion a try ... we bring a variety of recipe ideas to this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Tuesday, 8 October 2019

"In praise of bones and fat"


Joanna Blythman writes:

"Lean cuts lack flavour, so why did we turn against fatty, sinewy, tastier meat options?

Duck confit. Slow roast shoulder of lamb. Osso bucco. Short ribs. Chicken wings. These are my top five meat dishes. Can you spot the common factor? They all have bones and a fair amount of fat. Now I know that my personal preference runs contrary to the modern obsession with lean, unboned meat. So when someone is carving a chicken they generally love having me at the table, because while most people ask for breast – which is pretty boring to eat, if you ask me – I’m only too happy to eat the wings, the thighs, the legs, and positively delighted to devour the crisp roast skin that others are studiously avoiding.

I feel the same way about bacon: it has to be streaky. This, by the way, is a position that has earned me brownie points with my local butcher, who shares my preference, even though he sells more lean than fatty bacon. In a restaurant, my appetite isn’t whetted by pork loin. The belly interests me much more. I’ll never choose lamb loin either, but chops grilled over charcoal is a favourite. Steak? You can keep the fillet or sirloin. I’ll go for the un-boned rib every time. Chicken ‘Supremes’? Dull as ditch-water, almost invariably dry and characterless animal protein at its most tedious. They just don’t activate the pleasure centres of my brain or woo my palate.

The way I see it, bone and fat are flavour’s best friends. They hang around in a little gang together, and add up to something that’s rewarding to eat. And let’s not forget the minor members of the tasty meat gang: gelatine, connective tissue, collagen, the jelly in your pork pie, the viscosity of patiently reduced beef gravy; these secondary players all have a hand in creating winning consistencies and deliciousness.

In the UK, I think we’re losing our grasp of the elements that make great meat. Supermarkets focus intently on selling us mince and lean cuts. Their beef stew cuts, in my experience, are a penance: the more you cook them, the drier they become. Happily, an independent butcher can still sell you overlooked cuts such as shin, chuck, and blade, that become so rich, so moistly tender with time.

Why did we turn against such marvellous cuts? I blame relentless government advice to avoid saturated fat for diminishing our understanding of meat. It doesn’t make sense when no meat is composed purely of saturated fat. Beef, for instance, consists of, on average, 50% saturated, 45% monounsaturated, and 5% polyunsaturated fat.

The post war anti-sat fat crusade, in my view, was predicated on the weakest type of science: epidemiological studies. These analyses were often based on notoriously unreliable diet questionnaires. But the latest, much more robust systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomised trials, published in the British Medical Journal, have found no statistically significant results to implicate saturated fat as a major cause of coronary heart disease.

Of course, it’s up to you. If you believe the ordinances about saturated fat, you must sacrifice taste for what you believe to be better health. I pay more heed to the words of a towering figure in British nutrition, surgeon captain Thomas Latimer Cleave*: ‘For a modern disease to be related to an old-fashioned food is one of the most ludicrous things I have ever heard in my life.’

I can’t help but think of my grandmother, whose stews melted on the plate, whose marvellously restorative broths – learned from her female forbearers – always started with boiling bones and fatty meat. Perhaps I was brainwashed as a child, but I’ll trust her culinary wisdom over contemporary orthodoxy any day."


… Reading Joanna's words, speaking personally, when I look back to the 50's and 60's I too can remember my Grandmother, and my Mother, making wonderful stews many of which started from boiling bones, the meat just seemed to melt in your mouth! Now in 2019, we still enjoy meat casseroles etc.
However, more and more people have turned to eating less fat, less meat and some prefer vegetarian/ vegan menu plans. It is of course a personal choice.


We do like chicken in our house, it's a great favourite, some prefer skin on while others choose skin off. Do you eat meat? I wonder if you have got a cut of meat that you prefer?

If you were wondering who *Thomas Latimer (Peter) Cleave (1906–1983) was. He was a surgeon captain who researched the negative health effects of consuming refined carbohydrate (notably sugar and white flour) which would not have been available during early human evolution.

Related Post - Chicken Skin Is Good For You - read it here

Dear reader, this blog is presented in a magazine style - we hope something for everyone. You will find a variety of articles, studies, thoughts, photographs, music and recipes!

However, not all the recipes and food choice ideas featured in this blog may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

Monday, 7 October 2019

Autumn fruit frangipane galette ... the lower carb way !

Did you know, that recipes for frangipane can be found in cookbooks dating back to the early 17th century. Frangipane, sometimes spelled frangipani, is similar to a pastry cream, and some may refer to it as specifically an almond pastry cream. Actually, frangipane can be any cream or custard-like substance with nuts. What makes it different from the average pastry cream is that it is often used as a filling in pies and is baked. This results in a very different crusty exterior to pies or tarts, and is a quite rich and delicious alternative to standard fruit pies. Galette, is a flat round cake of pastry often topped with fruit. If you then add in some wonderful lower-carb fruits and make the pasty/dish the lower carb way you have a "stunning dessert which is not off-limits even on a low-carb diet, Use any seasonal ripe lower-carb fruit such as apricots, plums, berries or apples that are naturally sweet and you won’t need any added sugar.


Serves 12
Per serving: Carbohydrates, 14g; Protein, 12g; Fat, 44g; Fibre, 7.4g;
Ingredients:
For the pastry
2 Medjool dates, finely chopped
2 tbsp. milk
150g cold butter, cut into small cubes
150g ground almonds
100g coconut flour
Finely grated zest of a lemon
2 eggs
2 tbsp. cream
2 tsp vanilla extract
For the frangipane
2 Medjool dates, finely chopped
2 tbsp. water
100g butter
100g ground almonds
2 medium eggs
1 tsp almond extract
1 tsp vanilla extract

500g ripe lower-carb fruits such as plums, cut into bite‑sized pieces

Method:
1. Heat the oven to 350 F/ 180 C / Gas 4. Make the pastry first by softening the dates in the milk in a bowl in the microwave or in a small pan over a medium heat.
2. Use a fork to mash it into a puree. Sieve the date mixture into a mixing bowl and add the butter, almonds, coconut flour and zest.
3. Stir together with a wooden spoon until they are well combined.
4. Add the eggs, cream and vanilla extract and stir to form a smooth dough. This can also be done in a food processor.
5. Bring the pastry into a ball, cover with baking parchment and rest in the fridge for 20 minutes.
6. In the meantime, make the frangipane by mixing the ingredients together with a metal spoon in a bowl or food processor.
7. Remove the pastry from the fridge and lay it over an oven tray lined with baking parchment.
8. Put another piece of parchment over the top and use your hands to push the pastry out into a circle measuring approximately 30cm across. Now spoon the frangipane over the pastry leaving a 3cm clear border.
9. Use a metal slice or palette knife to fold the edges up over the frangipane creating a case. Don’t worry if they crack as the frangipane will seal the gap.
10. Now lay the fruit over randomly or in a pattern and transfer the tray to the oven to bake for about 25 minutes, then turn the oven down to 160c/gas 3 and cook for a further 10 minutes or until golden-brown around the edges.
11. Allow to cool on the tray before transferring to a serving dish. You can move it using the base of a loose-bottomed cake tin.
12. Serve with crème fraîche, mascarpone or whipped double (heavy) cream."

Recipe seen here

Why not learn more about low carb flours (which this recipe uses) from Libby at 'Ditch The Carbs' site, she has a very good guide, which you can read here

You will find a variety of recipe ideas and articles within this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.


All the best Jan