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Thursday, 8 August 2019

Root Vegetable Chips : Lower Carb Eating


You may already have seen the news about, 'The Diabetes Weight-Loss Cookbook.' it's been featured in the UK's Daily Mail and also on Diet Doctor site … plus I suspect many others. It contains some great lower carb recipe ideas and the one below recently featured in the Daily Mail.

But did you know that "Our bodies respond to a sugary meal by producing the hormone insulin, which pushes sugar into muscle cells for energy. Insulin also pushes any excess sugar into belly fat and the liver, where it builds up over time, causing obesity and fatty liver disease.

Essentially, people with type 2 diabetes have a problem dealing with sugar, or glucose.

So it builds up in the bloodstream, resulting in higher than normal blood sugars that can, over time, damage small blood vessels in vital organs.

Complications such as blindness, nerve damage and even amputations can eventually follow.

While it’s generally accepted that foods high in sugar can contribute to type 2 diabetes, the role played by starchy carbohydrates – which also contain sugar – is sometimes overlooked.

Following a low-carb diet can, however, help put an end to this destructive sugar cycle." 

Now onto the recipe ... 
"These glorious root vegetable chips are the ultimate alternative to deep fried potato chips. We have used roots but even the stems of cauliflower leaves make excellent chips. To give you some carb comparisons per 100g (3½oz) fried chips: sweet potatoes contain 20g carbs, white potatoes 18g, parsnips 12g, carrots 7g, swede 5g and the lowest of all, celeriac, has just 2.3g. 

Serves 4 l Per serving 7.8g carbs, 1.3g protein, 1.9g fat, 4.3g fibre, 62kcal

  • 500g (1lb 2oz) root vegetables, such as swede, celeriac, parsnips, carrots and turnips, cut into chips (100g of each)
  • Lard, beef dripping, duck fat, goose fat or coconut oil, for shallow or deep-frying
  • Salt

Heat the fat to 180°C (350°F) in either a deep-fat fryer or a high-sided saucepan and fry the chips for 2 minutes or until very lightly browned. 

Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside on kitchen paper until cool to the touch. Fry as above for a further 1-2 minutes until slightly darker and set aside as before. 

Just before you are ready to serve, fry for the last time for a further 1-2 minutes or until golden brown all over and cooked through. Serve straight away, scattered with salt to taste."
The above picture and words from article here

Related articles:
'Root Vegetables : So Healthy' here
'Introduction to low-carb for beginners' - find it here

Please note we have no commercial interest in promoting 'The Diabetes Weight-Loss Cookbook.' We share this article because we like the recipes, and find that they fit well with our Low Carb Higher (Healthy) Fat Lifestyle.

You will find a variety of articles and recipe ideas within this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

24 comments:

Tom said...

...they look mighty good.

Snowbird said...

Those veggie chips look delicious!xxx

William Kendall said...

That's different.

Christine said...

yummy root vegetables!

mxtodis123 said...

Looks very yummy. Must try these.

Miss Val's Creations said...

We accidentally had mushroom chips once. They were overcooked in the oven but turned out to be amazing!

kathyinozarks said...

sounds good

My name is Erika. said...

Yum! I think they have to be better than French fries or chips as you call them! Happy end of the week.Erika

NanaDiana said...

I have had some of these. They are pretty tasty and give a good crunch. Hubby likes them real well. Oh- to have healthy potato chips!!!!!

Elephant's Child said...

They sound like excellent alternatives.

aussie aNNie said...

Chippie baked vegs are fabulously tasty.

Vivat Indonesia said...

all hail for vegen :D nice share

Valerie-Jael said...

I love this way to eat veggies. Valerie

Linda said...

Looks tasty!

Evi Erlinda said...

I love root chips, carrot, taro, and burdock root. Crispy and Yummy.

Jo said...

They look very tasty.

CJ Kennedy said...

Might have to give these a try. Your ratatouille recipe from the other day was a big hit.

roughterrain crane said...

Thanks for your healthy information. I like to eat carrots.

craftytrog said...

They look delicious Jan! I was interested to see sweet potato chips were higher than normal potato. I thought they were meant to be healthier for diabetics.

Ygraine said...

Oh I MUST try these!!
They look (and sound) so delicious...and I'm sure you know by now that I absolutely adore root vegetables!😊😊
Thank you so much!

Wishing you a super weekend!

Hugs xxx

Terri said...

I fry turnips and rutabagas for my husband...actually pretty good stuff!

Sue said...

There are some great ideas here Jan, we've had swede chips quite a few times. As long as you don't try and tell yourself that they are potato chips they taste good. Have a wonderful weekend, Sue x

Lowcarb team member said...

craftytrog said...
They look delicious Jan! I was interested to see sweet potato chips were higher than normal potato. I thought they were meant to be healthier for diabetics

Hello, and many thanks for your comment and question.
There is always debate about the white (normal) potato compared to the sweet potato.

Both potatoes are a healthy carbohydrate source, not good for all!

The same amount of white potatoes and sweet potatoes contain about the same amount of carbohydrates (1/2 cup = 15 grams of carbs), although yes in many articles depending on size of potato a sweet potato can show a higher carb count. (it can be confusing)

Sweet potatoes, however, have more fibre and are slightly lower on the glycemic index than white potatoes. For this reason, blood glucose will rise a little more gradually with sweet potatoes than with white potatoes, and can be more diabetic friendly.

My husband Eddie is a type 2 diabetic and finds that his blood sugar readings are better if he should (occasionally) eat a little sweet potato. Whereas with white potato he sees a steeper rise, which of course a well controlled diabetic does not want to see, and he avoids them.

If you have diabetes, it is very important to watch what you eat and know the foods that raise, or spike blood sugars... hence I always give the warning that ... If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

Hope this explanation helps

All the best Jan

Conniecrafter said...

I always thought that sweet potatoes were better than white but I see they have more carbs, I also never heard of frying in goose or duck fat, very interesting.