Total Pageviews

Saturday, 21 November 2020

Tips For A Healthy Thanksgiving


Here in the UK the Countdown to Christmas continues. Christmas Cards are being written, Christmas Gifts being bought … and possibly you've got some food in the cupboard or freezer waiting to be consumed over the Christmas festivities. Of course with Covid still very much in evidence Christmas gatherings could well be different.

If like me you have American friends and bloggers they have been busy getting ready for Thanksgiving Day which is on Thursday 26th November … for our blogging friends in Canada they have already celebrated theirs!

As Covid is a world-wide issue holiday celebrations for many of us will be different this year but we can still do our best to have a healthy holiday season/thanksgiving.

I share an article from James Colquhoun in which he gives seven tips for a healthy thanksgiving. He writes; "when it comes to holiday celebrations, it can be difficult to resist all those extra treats and temptations, with good intentions sometimes flying out the window. It is possible to keep a reign on your health and feel fantastic throughout Thanksgiving, however, with these seven simple tricks.

1. Load Up On Veggies
With roast turkey a common thanksgiving meal in many homes, it is the ideal dish to boost with veggies. Load up on pumpkin, kale, sweet potatoes, asparagus, carrots, onions, cabbage, Brussel sprouts, green beans, garlic, and mushrooms, and you will find you have a plate of sensational goodness right there – no guilt necessary! Just be careful how you cook your veggies, using a high-quality oil if roasting (keeping oil to a minimum), steaming as many veggies as possible to ensure their nutritional value is maintained. Complement them with homemade gravy and fresh cranberry sauce, and voila!

2. Experiment With A New Menu
Thanksgiving is the perfect time to cook up a storm, so why not break some boundaries and do something different this year? It’s the perfect moment to think outside the square and make your own thanksgiving classics! With so many delicious and healthy recipes available, you can nurture your body with tasty nutritional dishes galore. Try gluten/grain/dairy/meat-free if you want – it’s up to you!

3. Practice Conscious Consumption
Eating mindfully and slowly is one of the best ways to listen and respond to your body. Being aware of each mouthful as you eat brings your mind to the moment and helps your stomach connect with your brain, allowing you to sense when you feel satisfied. The antithesis of mindless consumption, conscious consumption enables you to revel in and feel grateful for each taste, flavour, and sensation that you encounter.

4. Hold Back On The Gluten
Gluten is a protein composite found in several types of grains, including wheat, spelt, rye and barley. Gluten does not agree with everyone, and even in those who do not experience an obvious intolerance, it has been shown to cause lethargy, bloating, stomach pain, diarrhoea, and irritable bowel syndrome to just name a few side effects. Gluten has even been linked to some serious autoimmune diseases such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Holding back on the bread over the holiday period is therefore not unwise.

5. Steer Clear Of Refined Sugar
One of the main sources of calories is refined sugar – and it is poison! In fact, excessive sugar consumption is probably the largest factor underlying obesity and chronic disease in America. It damages the immune system, causes mood swings and premature aging, and contributes to ailments such as tooth decay, osteoporosis, and heart disease. Found in pre-packaged foods, refined sugar is toxic, and should be avoided at all costs.

6. Look After You
If you are out dining with friends or family over the Thanksgiving period, don’t feel you have to bend to peer pressure by gorging on the food you would rather not have. Feel free to refuse a second helping or give the chocolate box a swerve. If eating out, suggest a restaurant you know has a great healthy menu. You deserve to look after yourself and ultimately your body will thank you for it.

7. Limit Your Alcohol Intake
Everyone loves to relax and unwind over the holiday season, but overdoing it in the alcohol stakes can leave you feeling sluggish, moody, dehydrated, and on a big come-down. With alcohol depleting the body of essential minerals and nutrients, zapping energy, and causing weight gain, keeping tabs on the amount you consume is a good idea. Alternatively, you could ditch it altogether, and go for a fresh juice mocktail instead, packed full of feel-good fabulousness!"
You can see James' original article here

Related Posts
Turkey, a fool-proof guide, perfect for Thanksgiving or Christmas - see it here

If you should be looking for alternative Vegetarian and Vegan Thanksgiving / Christmas recipes have a look here please note not all shown in the link are low carb!


This blog brings a variety of articles and recipe ideas, and it is important to note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

34 comments:

Christine said...

Wonderful advice thank you.

Elephant's Child said...

A happy, health and safe Thanksgiving to all those who celebrate.

Tom said...

...it's a tough time of year!

Margaret D said...

Nice to read.

aussie aNNie said...

We don't do this in Australia, so guess I miss out on the scrummy food. xx

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

Some really great advice, Jan. I will be eating a lot of veggies for Thanksgiving, because I don't eat meat, even turkey (fowl, of course). People often dislike eating with me, because I eat SO slowly. I taste and chew every bite. No gulping things down in my world. And I won't be consuming any alcohol, either. I will, however, be cooking for one, but feeding both cats a special treat, too. Christmas countdown starts the day after Thanksgiving, so I plan to enjoy the day, even in isolation.

Valerie-Jael said...

Good advice. I'm not celebrating anything this year, no fun alone! Valerie

Natalia said...

These are all grear tips, also for Christmas or any holidays ☺

Betty said...

Wishing you and all those celebrating Thanksgiving a safe one. Everything in your post sounds sensible.

Ela said...

Thank you for a lot of interesting information!
Greetings

linda said...

Some very good advice there, it's a shame that all the things we enjoy the most do us the most harm. It's saying no to chocolate that's the most difficult for me. Have a great weekend.xx

eileeninmd said...

Hello,

Great tips and post. Even though it will be just hubby and I, we are fixing the traditional turkey dinner on Thanksgiving. I do love all the veggies and the leftovers. Take care, enjoy your weekend!

baili said...

another very informative and impressive post dear Jan

i like such readings that help me understand how can i improve my health and your blog gives all i need thankfully :)
today we see less people eat their food with mindfulness and i too learnt it in hard way
thank you for wonderful blogging !
blessings!

Victor S E Moubarak said...

It is such a shame we do not celebrate a Thanksgiving Day in the UK. We have so much to be thankful for.

God bless.

CJ Kennedy said...

The best of everything in moderation

Martha said...

This one sure will be different. Wishing you a happy Thanksgiving!

Teresa said...

Para todos los que lo celebran, Feliz día de Acción de Gracias. Besos.

Rose said...

We will go to the girls unless something happens....everything in moderation is a good practice all the time.

Marleen said...

It will all be different this year, but we can still be thankful for all the things that we CAN do. Wish you a happy Thanksgiving Jan.

Sandra Cox said...

Good tips. Especially loading up on veggies:) Heh.
Have a great weekend.

bill burke said...

Good advice to follow.

David M. Gascoigne, said...

All of the advice in your post is wise counsel, but I suspect that at Thanksgiving discipline and common sense go out the window, and it becomes an orgy of overeating - and a second bout of excess at Christmas is not so far off either.

Shari Burke said...

As immigrants, we will do our own wee lockdown Thanksgiving on Thursday, while regular lockdown Thursday goes on around us :-)

Debbie said...

this is awesome information...i do suspect however that my meal will not be low calorie. i can however guarantee it will be delicious!!

Divers and Sundry said...

Great advice! Gluttony just hurts enjoyment of the food.

JFM/Jan said...

Great information Jan...thank you!

My name is Erika. said...

Nice article. The holidays are going to be very different this year. I'll roast a turkey and of course do some veggies. This is a nice article with some good points.

Jenn Jilks said...

I imagine we'll have the same menus as always here! IF it all works out!

mamasmercantile said...

It will be interesting to see what the restrictions will be so that we can plan a Christmas. Not easy when the family all have different restrictions spread out around both England and Scotland.

Susan Zarzycki said...

Great tips! I have bookmarked them for a reminder to not get carried away with holiday craziness when it comes to food.💖

nassah said...

nice post

Lorrie said...

Good advice for any family get together. We're all wondering what Christmas is going to be like!

Martha said...

Good advice for all!

Jeanie said...

These are all wonderful tips, Jan. For me, Thanksgiving is basically only slightly more ëlaborate"than any other meal. We'll have a turkey breast and savory sweet potatoes, some veg. Not a huge meal. That's the good thing about being on our own.... you can control it more easily.