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Saturday, 23 November 2019

Souper Saturday : Mushroom and Garlic Soup !



Grab your spoon and dive into this bowl of soup! The recipe has a mix of mellow garlic, and mushrooms. 

Ingredients
Serves Four
2 bunches of chives, roughly chopped (about 1.5 ounces/42 g)
1 cup extra virgin olive oil (240 ml)
3 whole heads of garlic
15 raw cloves of garlic, peeled and sliced in half
12 to 16 ounces mushrooms, thinly sliced (340 to 450 g)
2 tablespoons unsalted butter (30 g)
1 leek, thinly sliced
3 1/2 cups chicken stock (820 ml)

Salt and pepper

Instructions 
In a blender, purée the chives with the olive oil until the chives are very finely chopped and the consistency of the oil is fairly smooth. Be patient, this will take several minutes.

In two batches, strain the oil through a fine sieve. Let the oil drip out on its own; don’t push down on the solids or the chive oil will be cloudy. Discard the solids. Add a pinch of salt to the oil. Set aside. (The oil will keep for at least a week in the fridge.)

Preheat oven to 400 °F (200 °C) Gas Mark 6

Peel off any loose layers of white skin on the three heads of garlic then slice the top off to expose the tops of the cloves. Drizzle a little olive oil on top of the heads. Season with salt and pepper. Wrap each head in foil or parchment paper (tie parchment up with a string) or put them in a tightly covered baking dish.

Put the heads of garlic in the oven and roast until the cloves are tender and easy to pierce with a fork, about 35 minutes. When the garlic has cooled, squeeze the roasted cloves into a small bowl.

Spread the mushrooms out on a baking pan. Drizzle with olive oil and lightly season with salt and pepper.

Put the pan of mushrooms in the oven at the same time as the heads of garlic, roasting until soft, about 20 minutes. Stir the mushrooms occasionally.

Melt butter in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the leek and cook until soft.

Add the roasted garlic and raw garlic cloves and sauté for a few minutes.

Add chicken stock. Cover and simmer until the raw garlic cloves are very tender, about 20 minutes.

Working in batches, purée the soup in a blender until smooth.

Heap mushrooms in the middle of each soup bowl and drizzle in chive oil.

Original recipe idea may be seen here

Enjoy!


Did you know that; Garlic is a root vegetable that belongs to the Allium genus and is closely related to onions, leeks, chives and shallots. Each serving of garlic boasts a good amount of several important nutrients, including manganese, vitamin B6 and vitamin C. Plus, it’s well-known for its medicinal properties, studies have found that garlic can promote heart health by lowering blood pressure and levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. It may also boost immune function, as research shows that it can decrease symptom severity and help prevent infections, such as the common cold. Best of all, garlic is highly versatile and can be used to amplify the flavour of your favourite savoury soups, sauces, side dishes and main courses.

Readers, we bring a variety of articles, studies etc. plus recent news/views and recipe ideas to this blog, we hope something for everyone to read and enjoy. Please note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

23 comments:

Jan/JFM said...

In a word... yummmmmmm I

Tom said...

...looks good and creamy!

Valerie-Jael said...

Yummy. We had onion soup topped with melted cheese today. Valerie

Chris Lally said...

Perfect for this chilly day! Thank you, Jan:)

Elephant's Child said...

I am a big, big fan of both mushrooms and garlic. I would, of course, not use the chicken stock, but will keep this recipe for more 'soupy' weather.

The Happy Whisk said...

I love making mushroom and garlic soup.
Mine though, no animal products but very creamy.
Happy Weekend and boogie boogie.

Jo said...

That looks so good.

Snowbird said...

Oh...I say! How scrumptious!xxx

sandy said...

I'm grabbing my spoon and this recipe!! looks so good and it's so cold here right now it would be a perfect dinner. I think I read where you are having a lot of rain

Anne (cornucopia) said...

This sounds delicious.

Sandra Cox said...

Ooh, another tasty one.

Martha said...

Must make! I would love this.

Margaret-whiteangel said...

Now that would be a delight to eat.

Iris Flavia said...

Sadly not a fan of garlic, but your beautiful Brussels Sprouts soup is on the way over here! They sit in the kitchen corner already :-)

Sami said...

I've made mushroom soup but never with garlic. Will have to try this version Jan :)

William Kendall said...

That sounds good.

baili said...

oh my mom would have LOVED this one
she used grow lots and lots of garlic in her garden and would use it in her special dishes for health care
i love garlic either ,it is regular part of daily food here

Jeanie said...

THis looks really, really, really, really, really, really good!

italiafinlandia said...

This is for me! I am a soup lover... :)

Bob Bushell said...

Lovely soup, and with mushrooms.

Phil Slade said...

I really will try this. I just love garlic and I have been searching for a good garlic soup recipe since eating it in Spain.

Phil Slade said...

Found this online. Guess you know about leaving garlic for ten or fifteen minutes after chopping/slicing?

"In order to preserve some of allicin's healing attributes, many scientists suggest chopping or dicing your garlic, then letting it stand for ten minutes to let the alliinase do its work and form as much allicin as possible before it's neutralized by heat. You don't have to be thorough, either: even cutting the tops off of garlic cloves is enough to break the cell walls and start the formation of allicin.

So the next time you're cooking, be sure to mince your garlic first thing, then let it stand. By the time you're done getting the rest of your ingredients ready, those crushed cloves will have a lot of allicin moving around in their cells, which will enable you to fight another day."

Lowcarb team member said...

Phil Slade said...
Found this online. Guess you know about leaving garlic for ten or fifteen minutes after chopping/slicing?

"In order to preserve some of allicin's healing attributes, many scientists suggest chopping or dicing your garlic, then letting it stand for ten minutes to let the alliinase do its work and form as much allicin as possible before it's neutralized by heat. You don't have to be thorough, either: even cutting the tops off of garlic cloves is enough to break the cell walls and start the formation of allicin.

So the next time you're cooking, be sure to mince your garlic first thing, then let it stand. By the time you're done getting the rest of your ingredients ready, those crushed cloves will have a lot of allicin moving around in their cells, which will enable you to fight another day."

Hello Phil, many thanks for your comments both here and on other posts …
Many thanks for sharing the above tip... an important one.
I sometimes think garlic is a love it or hate it ingredient … a bit like Marmite!
I happen to like both!

There is a good article called 'Four Tips How To Cook With Garlic'
Find it here
www.eatingwell.com/article/275955/4-tips-for-how-to-cook-with-garlic/

I hope you enjoy this mushroom and garlic soup recipe.

All the best Jan