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Thursday, 14 October 2021

Three Common Nutrient Deficiencies

Most Common Nutrient Deficiencies Impacting Your Energy and Mood

Dizziness, low energy, fatigue, headaches… These are all common signs that your body is telling you it needs more of a certain nutrient so it can keep you healthy.

In our modern, fast-paced, and nutritionally-starved world, deficiencies are all too common. Even if you’re not struggling with a nutrient deficiency, most of us are likely to have suffered from low levels of nutrients in the past, or will do in the future.

To break down the important science, nutrients are those little things that foods are broken into when they’re digested, and each essential nutrient is responsible for activities in the body - important ones that keep us alive. Essentially, it’s a broad term that covers our foods, from macronutrients like protein, carbs, and fats, to micronutrients - our vitamins and minerals that are harder to keep track of.

They’re called essential because the body can’t produce them alone; they need to be enjoyed through the diet. That’s why having a broad and balanced diet is key to good health. So when we aren’t getting the right amount for our daily needs, the essential functions they support in the body start to falter. And that’s where those nagging symptoms of dizziness and low energy begin to set in.

Working out exactly what nutrient you are deficient in can be a lengthy, expensive, and draining process, so a lot of medical research is focused on determining the most common nutrient deficiencies - that is, the ones you are most at risk of, and the ones you are least at risk of.


Here Are The Top 3 Of The Most Common Nutrient Deficiencies (& Quick Tips On How To Fix Them):
1. Iron
It is estimated that 80% of the population suffers from iron deficiency and 30% suffer from anaemia, which is prolonged or chronic iron deficiency. One of the most noticeable symptoms of iron deficiency is fatigue and lack of energy. Other symptoms can be weakness, pale skin, shortness of breath, dizziness, headaches, brittle nails, fast heartbeat, strange cravings for non-food substances like ice or dirt (called pica), cold hands and feet, tingling, or a crawling feeling in the legs.

There are many plant-based and animal sources of iron that include (but are not limited to) spirulina, legumes, dark green leafy vegetables, pistachios, seeds, quinoa, broccoli, dark chocolate, raw cacao powder, shellfish, grass-fed liver and organ meats, grass-fed red meat, pasture-raised poultry, tuna, sardines, and eggs. It’s also important to eat your iron with vitamin C as this is essential for the body!

2. Zinc
Zinc is an often overlooked nutrient, which in itself is contributing to the further development of chronic disease. This mineral is ​​necessary for proper immune function, normal thymus gland function, and protection of the thymus from cellular damage. It is required for protein synthesis (that is making protein within the body), cell growth, and wound healing, as well as normal skin function. Zinc is also essential for the maintenance of vision, taste, and smell and is critical to healthy male sex hormones and prostate function.

While there is a whole raft of ways that a zinc deficiency (or even just low levels) can have a serious impact on the body, there is also an abundance of zinc-rich foods that can bring you back to health. These include pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, chickpeas, lentils, cashews, mushrooms, spinach, avocado, grass-fed meat, pasture-raised dairy products, and oysters.

3. Magnesium
Although magnesium is found in a wide variety of foods it is still a common deficiency amongst the population. In fact, it is believed to be the leading global deficiency. Symptoms of a mild deficiency aren’t noticeable as the body has mechanisms to preserve stores, but interestingly severe deficiency can be a result of alcohol consumption, the use of certain medications, or malabsorption - all elements of a modern lifestyle.

Your best bet for magnesium-rich foods is plant-based sources, including green leafy vegetables such as spinach and swiss chard, dark chocolate, raw cacao powder, sunflower seeds, cashews, flaxseeds, almonds, pepitas, amaranth, buckwheat, black beans, avocado, quinoa, and spirulina.

These are just three of the top deficiencies.
Above words taken from article by James Colquhoun here

Please note, the above is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, medication, you should contact your local health care provider.


You will find a variety of articles/recipe ideas, within this blog. It is important to note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

25 comments:

Tom said...

...I hope that I'm doing well.

Rose said...

This is so interesting. I would not have thought about it making a difference for animals be grass fed. But it makes sense.

Angie said...

Jan - thanks for the great advice! Good thing I love dark, leafy vegies so much!!!

William Kendall said...

Iron is an occasional issue for me.

J.P. Alexander said...

Buena entra siempre hay que cuidarse, te mando un beso

Christine said...

I didn't know about zinc and magnesium being common deficiencies

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

I try to eat 1/2 an avocado every day. I seem to be doing something right, because it sure seems to work for a lot of vitamins and nutrients. Thanks for this review, Jan.

judee said...

Being a vegetarian and now a vegan, I frequently have to supplement with iron because despite a really healthy diet, I tend to not get enough iron. I've experienced the fatigue, crawling sensation in the legs, and brittle nails from low iron levels. Very helpful post bringing awareness to an important subject.

Margaret D said...

Most important are those 3.

Elephant's Child said...

Thank you. Only today I was wondering whether I need to increase my magnesium uptake...

Valerie-Jael said...

Good advice. We need a balanced diet to get our nutrients. Have a great day, Valerie

baili said...

awesome and very informative article dear Jan
thank you for sharing ,i really appreciate your effort to make your readers aware of things essential to learn about health .
blessings to you and family!

Sandi said...

I have been feeling pretty tired lately. Maybe I should start taking vitamins again.

Salty Pumpkin Studio said...

Very Important info. Thank you

pam nash said...

very interesting - thanks!

yonosoymillenium said...

es bueno saberlo, a veces nos falta energĂ­a y no sabemos el motivo

DeniseinVA said...

A fascinating article with very important information. Thank you so much!

DVArtist said...

I take minerals everyday.

DUTA said...

Minerals are no less important to the human body than vitamins.You've mentioned three of the most important ones: iron, zinc, magnesium and the ways to get them from food.
Sometimes a supplement is also needed. When I feel the flu is on its way to me, I'll take a tiny zinc supplement for prevention.

Jenn Jilks said...

It's all about balance and cariety!

Conniecrafter said...

I know something is off balance for me right now, just trying to figure out what it is can be hard

My name is Erika. said...

Just had mine checked awhile back and I am good. But I know what you mean. My husband ended up pretty iron deficient once. It was scary. Happy Friday!

Miss Val's Creations said...

So much to pay attention too. I am always eating a variety to keep the vitamins coming.

https://linsartyblobs.blogspot.com said...

Looks like I will have to change from eating milk chocolate to dark chocolate.

Divers and Sundry said...

I like most of these foods and hope I get enough. I do take a magnesium supplement...