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Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Cream - perfect on your dessert, in your cooking, in your coffee !




Isn't cream wonderful ... luscious and smooth, there really is nothing that spells dessert satisfaction, like cream.

"Fresh unpasteurised milk quickly separates and the fat rises to the top. This fat layer is then skimmed off and is known as cream.

Cream has long been a versatile ingredient in the kitchen and can form a base to desserts, such as posset, or can be added to both sweet and savoury sauces to create a rich, smooth texture. Cream is also served just as it is, poured or spooned over hot or cold puddings and used as a garnish for soups. 

Choose the best, it’s important to choose the right type of cream depending on what you are making. As a rule the higher the fat content the easier it will be to use, as the fat will holds the liquid elements together. A higher fat cream will therefore be less likely to split or curdle when incorporated with hot ingredients and will also whisk up well to an airy whipped cream.

Single cream, is a richer version of milk, with around 18% fat content. You can use it for pouring or adding to coffee. Single cream will not whip and will curdle if boiled, so it can't be a substitute in recipes that call for whipping or double cream.

Whipping cream, has around a 36% fat content, which allows air to be trapped when whipped, roughly doubling the volume. Once whipped, it can be used to top desserts or fill cakes and pastries.

Double cream, is the thickest with around a 48% fat content. It makes an ideal pouring cream, such as when serving with fruit, or it can be whipped and piped for decorating desserts. It can also be used to add richness and creaminess to savoury dishes. Extra thick double cream is made by heating then rapidly cooling double cream - this creates a thicker cream.

Soured cream, has been treated with lactic acid, which gives it a tangy taste. It has a thick texture but only around an 18% fat content. Use it for making cheesecakes, dips, topping nachos, and in soups and sauces - but it cannot be boiled or it will spilt.

Créme fraîche, is similar to soured cream but with a milder taste. It is traditionally made from unpasteurised cream that has been left to ferment, but nowadays, pasteurised cream is thickened and soured with the addition of bacteria. It has around a 48% fat, which means it does not curdle when cooked. Serve with fresh fruit and in soups, casserole and dips. Low or half-fat crème fraîche is readily available and this means some of the fat is replaced with natural thickeners and stabilisers so that it will still hold together in cooking.

Clotted cream, has the highest fat percentage of all creams at 55%. It's made by baking double cream until a delicious crust forms on the surface. This silky, butter-coloured cream is a speciality of Devon and Cornwall (in England) where it is served with scones, butter and jam.

Store it, always store fresh cream in the fridge and use within one or two days of purchase. Créme fraîche will keep for 10-14 days in the fridge. Cream with a fat content of more than 35% can be frozen. Remember to pour a little from the top as it will expand when it freezes. Lower fat creams like single cream will separate when thawed but can be frozen when already incorporated into a dish.

Alternatives,
try yogurt."

Words from article here

You may also be interested in reading 'All About Types of Cream for Desserts' e.g. Chantilly cream, half and half, heavy cream and others in article here

...would you like some cream in your coffee!

You will find a variety of articles within this blog. It is important to note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

29 comments:

Tom said...

...smooth!

Jo said...

I didn't like cream when I was young but I love it now. It's funny how our tastes change as we get older.

Mildred said...

Since childhood, I love half/half in my one cup of coffee each day. Very interesting info. Thanks and have a great day.

laurie said...

mmmmm, so good!!!

Christine said...

Never thought about how rich whipping cream is, no wonder it is so delicious ...deceptively light tasting.

Catarina said...

I love whipping cream!

And clotted cream! Bought clotted cream for scones the other day. It is very expensive here.

Iris Flavia said...

Thank you, Jan, I never knew which to take for what for sure!

sandy said...

that was interesting to read. thanks

Lisa Isabella Russo said...

It was interesting to learn so much about cream, thank you!

Zaa said...

Hey Jan ... It’s amazing how diversified cream is..this is such an enlightening post. Thank You for sharing...Hugs

Out on the prairie said...

I get mine straight from the producer

William Kendall said...

I've never heard of creme fraiche before.

Elephant's Child said...

I mostly lean towards the yoghurt side. Mostly. Some things demand cream.

Cheryl mylittlepieceofengland said...

Ooh, I do like a drop of cream, not too much though xx

Martha said...

So many choices! It's not always easy to find all of them in one place.

happyone said...

Oh yes, some very good stuff. : )
I love whipped cream!!

The Happy Whisk said...

None for me, thank you. But happy drinking! And Happy Spring!

Lee said...

Definitely the cream of the crop!! :)

Mary Kirkland said...

Yep, I love the stuff.

Chris Lally said...

Why am I hungry? Great post, Jan!!

Margaret-whiteangel said...

Don't often use or eat cream.

peppylady (Dora) said...

I heard some people use coconut milk for whip cream. I haven't tried it.
Coffee is on

Lisa said...

Now all I can think of are scones and jam!
Hope you are having a good week.
Lisa x

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

I believe what the article is calling "single cream," we in the states call it 1/2 and 1/2. That's the name it is sold by in stores, too. It's what I use in my coffee. Very interesting post. Thanks, Jan.

Magic Love Crow said...

Thanks for all the great information! I love cream! Yummy!!

Linda said...

I miss cream! I don't tolerate cow dairy at all. I am able to eat a little goat yogurt but it's not the same as cream.

Anonymous said...

This was so informative.

Tina

Blue Grumpster said...

See, now I'm hungry. Did I mention I like any kind of cream? :)

carol l mckenna said...

Another great foodie foto ~ delish!

Happy Weekend to you,
A ShutterBug Explores,
aka (A Creative Harbor)