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Monday, 21 October 2019

The Benefits of Seaweed and Why You Should Be Eating More of It !


sea-weed salad, image from here

Jenna Helwig writes: 
"Ride the wave ... while seaweed has long been a staple of many Asian diets—particularly in Japanese cuisine—it’s showing up on more U.S. and other countries restaurant menus, also in packaged foods, and in home kitchens. What gives? Carolyn Brown, a registered dietitian at 'Foodtrainers' in New York City, says: “Seaweed is low-calorie (low carb), crunchy, salty, and super nutritious. The fact that it’s plant-based and high in protein makes it on-trend, too.” And thanks to online sources, seaweed is also easier to find than ever. 
Nutrition notes 
Brown says, “Seaweed is a vitamin and mineral jackpot, full of vitamins A and E, B vitamins, calcium, magnesium, potassium, copper, iron, and iodine.” It also contains omega-3s and polyphenols, and is a good source of protein and fibre.
Common kinds 
While there are more than 100 types of edible seaweed, these are the varieties you’ll see the most often. 
Nori 
Think of this as the gateway seaweed. It shows up on sushi rolls and in sheets as “seaweed snacks.” 
Kelp
Also known as kombu, kelp is the primary ingredient in dashi, a Japanese stock that forms the base of miso soup. Kelp powder can be added to smoothies, and kelp noodles are a staple in Korean cuisine.
Wakame
This is the main component of most seaweed salads and the wide, slippery seaweed found in miso soup.
Dulse
Usually sold dried, dulse comes whole, flaked, or powdered. Some people say it tastes like bacon when fried. We’ll let you be the judge of that.
3 Ways to Eat It (Besides Sushi)
From executive chef Jeremy Rock Smith of the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health and author of Kripalu Kitchen with David Joachim:
1. Add kombu (kelp) when preparing dried beans. The seaweed helps break down the sugars in beans that cause gas.
2. Sneak kelp into slaws for great depth of flavour.
3. Shake store-bought furikake—a topping that includes sesame seeds and nori—onto popcorn, roasted veggies, cooked fish, or omelettes.
Where (and How) to Buy

Nori sheets in the form of seaweed snacks are ubiquitous these days. Look for other varieties online and at Asian supermarkets, natural-food stores, and better-stocked grocery stores. Most seaweed is sold dried and consumed that way or reconstituted in warm water. Some seaweed, like kelp, is also available frozen, which means it doesn’t need to be reconstituted."
The above from article here  
I wonder, do you like to eat seaweed, have you tried it?

Related Posts:
Samphire : The Vegetable From The Sea here


Sea Bass and Samphire : Just Sublime here


Low-Carb Sushi Rolls : see here



We bring a variety of articles, studies etc. plus recent news/views and recipe ideas to this blog, we hope something for everyone to read and enjoy. Please note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan 

32 comments:

Catarina said...

It's a good suggestion. Thank you.

Valerie-Jael said...

I have tried it, but can't say I enjoyed it! Valerie

Karen said...

Thanks for your suggestions. I have gotten more serious about low carb and have lost 10 pounds! Hope I can keep it up. Hope you have a great week.

J C said...

Yes I have tried it. Yes I like it. I think it must be the Nori, because I get it from the little guy that makes sushi rolls in the corner of the supermarket, and once from a sushi bar.

I doubt I would like the others. I dont like slippery (like okra). I dont like Misu. Or is it Miso. I dunno. But I like that little asian guys seaweed, and his sushi rolls too. But not the ones uncooked.

Thickethouse.wordpress said...

I love seaweed and happily eat sheets of nori alone as a snack. The seaweed salad sold with sushi is too sweet, I think. I occasionally put kombu into vegetable soup and remove it when the soup is finished.

Jenn Jilks said...

I like putting it into my soups. Soon that season will be here.

Elephant's Child said...

Thank you. I will have to explore seaweeds more seriously.

Sandra said...

Surprisingly, this sounds good.

Chris Lally said...

Pretty convincing, Jan. We'll give it a try. Thanks:)

Christine said...

Thanks for sharing, I love it in sushi.

Rain said...

We feed the six furballs a home cooked diet and Kelp is a part of their daily meals!

sandy said...

I've never tried it before. I did find something - this is off that topic but an edemame pasta that I love - it's so light and healthy tasting but it's hard to find in most of the grocery stores we go to .

Sue said...

I must admit I'm not a seaweed lover, I'll stick to my more traditional veggies xx

bill burke said...

Never tried seaweed before, I'll have to give it a try maybe in soup.

Victor S E Moubarak said...

Never tried it. I bet it tastes like spinach.

God bless.

Susan Kane said...

Seaweed was a vital food source in Ireland during the famine.

Like Bill, I'll give it a try.

Tom said...

...thanks, but no thanks.

Iris Flavia said...

I once tried chicken sushi, but the seaweed tasted so fishy ... sadly not my thing. Very sadly.

roughterrain crane said...

You can enjoy a variety of seaweed dishes in Japan.

Teresa said...

No las he comido nunca y no sé si las probaré. Besitos.

eileeninmd said...

Hello,

I have not tried seaweed, not sure I want to try it.
Thanks for sharing the info. Have a happy day!

Angie said...

Jan - seaweed is not something I've had, other than in sushi. We'll have to look around and see if we can find it in Montana!

Sami said...

I love sushi, but never tried seaweed.

sheila 77 said...

How interesting, I've never tried seaweed. Maybe I should?
Is it not a bit salty?
As always, so good to read about different foods and recipes, thanks Jan.

Lowcarb team member said...

I always think it's good to try different tastes, I always encouraged my children to … and of course some they liked some they did not … but no matter our age, there are so many food choices to try!

Seaweed does have many benefits, and a few contra-indications!
Another article readers may wish to read through is:
15 Impressive Benefits of Seaweed
Find it here:
https://www.organicfacts.net/seaweed.html

Regular readers will know, that we bring a variety of articles, studies etc. plus recent news/views and recipe ideas to this blog, we hope something for everyone to read and enjoy. Please note, not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

Many thanks for all your thoughts and comments, it is appreciated.

All the best Jan

William Kendall said...

It's just not for me, I must say.

Snowbird said...

I've tried seaweed and loved it. Haven't tried samphire though, I keep looking at it in the supermarket, I really must try it!xxx

Francisco Manuel Carrajola Oliveira said...

São um excelente alimento as algas e aproveito para desejar a continuação de uma boa semana.

Andarilhar
Dedais de Francisco e Idalisa
O prazer dos livros

Debbie said...

i have never tried it and wonder if i would like it. wonderful benefits!!

Bob Bushell said...

I love seaweed, it is so beautiful to eat.

Little Wandering Wren said...

You've got me on a good month, as you know having just come back from Japan. I love seaweed especially now I know how beneficial it is :)

Magic Love Crow said...

Thank you for this great post Jan! Big Hugs!