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Thursday, 29 September 2022

Harvest Festival Time


'We plough the fields, and scatter the good seed on the land;
But it is fed and watered by God's almighty hand:
He sends the snow in winter, the warmth to swell the grain,
The breezes and the sunshine, and soft refreshing rain.
Chorus All good gifts around us
Are sent from heaven above,
Then thank the Lord, O thank the Lord
For all His love.'

The months of September and October are wonderful harvest months with vegetables such as Aubergine (egg-plant), Cabbage, Celeriac and Swede ... each of which is a low carbers favourite ... to fruits like apples, plums and raspberries, with raspberries definitely on many a low carbers dish. I used to enjoy both my local church and school harvest festivals and of course these still continue each year, many of which include the hymn above.

Yes, Harvest Festival is a traditional event celebrating the successful gathering of the year's crops. Often celebrated in churches and schools, people are encouraged to donate homegrown produce, fruit and vegetables to those in need. The Harvest Festival is a time for feasting, celebrating and giving thanks. It is also a time for honouring those who grow and reap crops.

In recent times the rise of food-banks has given Britain's harvest festival tradition a new momentum - but has left little room for fresh produce as part of the celebrations.

In the past, September was a time when churches and school halls were filled with an abundance of seasonal fresh fruit, vegetables and bread, much of it destined for those in need.

Although this still happens it has changed. Tinned and dried foods have become more prominent, and a strict 'no-perishables' policy is now common among many harvest festival organisers, whose goods are increasingly bound for foodbanks and charities.

When is the Harvest Festival celebrated?

The Harvest Festival occurs on the Sunday nearest to the appearance of the harvest moon. This is the full moon that appears closest to the autumn equinox, which is usually at the end of September or the beginning of October. The traditional start of the autumn season.

How is the Harvest Festival celebrated?

The Harvest Festival is usually a time to share locally grown produce with those in need and celebrate with a big feast. Churches are often decorated with fruits and vegetables brought by parishioners, which is then donated to charity.

The Harvest Festival is celebrated around the world across many different faiths and cultures. It takes place at different times of the year in different countries, according to when the main harvest is for each country. In the USA, the Harvest Festival is known as Thanksgiving and is a national holiday in November every year.

A nice vegetable for the harvest festival table is swede/rutabaga. It sits comfortably in the roasting tin alongside parsnips, carrots, beetroot and celeriac (also in season right now). However, swede does make a delicious soup or is great, simply mashed with butter and black pepper, as a vegetable side. Low in fat, high in fibre, packed with vitamin C and the minerals potassium (for a healthy heart) and calcium and magnesium, which are great for the bones.
You can read more about this vegetable, plus see some recipe suggestions here


As regular readers know, this blog is presented in a magazine style - we hope something for everyone. You will find a variety of articles, studies, thoughts, photographs, music and recipes! However, not all the recipe ideas featured in this blog may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues these must always be taken into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e., use your meter. If you have any concerns about your health, it is always advisable to consult your doctor or health care team.

All the best Jan

36 comments:

Tom said...

...the colors of the season are beautiful.

Ananka said...

These are such good veggies. I do love aubergines so much! Cannot believe we are nearly in October!

Jeanie said...

that's really a wonderful idea. We don't have anything like that where I am, though sometimes you'll see something fallish as a festival but this has such a wonderful focus to it. I love this time of year -- the gorgeous produce, the markets. You picked a beautiful photo for this one.

It's me said...

My favorite season…love all the autumn colors…and pumpkinsoup is my favorite…happy weekend enjoy love Ria 🧡🍂🍄🌾🍁🍀

Elephant's Child said...

How lovely to celebrate the rich produce of the land. And how sad that tinned/non perishable goods are now essential.

Christine said...

We welcome the harvest season!

The Joy of Home with Martha Ellen said...

The harvest season is my favorite. Of course sharing what we have with others is important especially during these hard times for so many.

J.P. Alexander said...

Genial me pareció un lindo festival. Te mando un beso.

William Kendall said...

I've not eaten those.

happyone said...

A colorful time of year!!!

Iris Flavia said...

I´ve never seen this vegetable here!
It is crazy. You are just around the corner. Jamie Oliver showed salted lemons you get in every supermarket in Great Britain. Never saw that here in Germany.
We plan to go to the farmer´s market tomorrow and I´ll keep my eyes open.

Betty said...

This is my favourite time of year, Autumn/harvest and then Halloween! I like the church version of events and suppose the foodbanks we have in the UK now are an extended example of this- goodwill, sharing, caring. I haven't ever tasted swede in a way I found pallatable, maybe soup would be a nice surprise.

Angie said...

Jan - how sad that tinned foods would replace a fresh harvest, but I know the need among the needy is great. We don't use rutabaga much in our cooking - maybe that needs to change. Have a great weekend!

Margaret D said...

Good article. Used to celebrate Harvest time back in the day down here, don't think it's done now.

Jules said...

Sadly, it is a sign of the times. It is the school's Harvest celebration this morning, and the donations will all be going to the local food bank. X

Valerie-Jael said...

I will be singing that song all day now. I used to love harvest festival when I was in England! Valerie

Breathtaking said...

Hello :=)
The Harvest Festival is not a tradition commonly done here n Portugal, but what a great idea for churches to donate the gifts to the needy.

Th fresh fruit and vegetable photo is a lovely choice to display the wealth of freshly picked colourful food.

I like Swede mashed with butter and black pepper, and soup made from this vegetable.
All the best.

Jo said...

I remember singing that hymn at school and I remember taking in offerings for the harvest festival, such a lovely time of year.

Jeff said...

I love rutabaga but haven't grown it in a few years. When I was living in GA, I grew it with turnips and beets over the winter. I have a second planting of beets and turnips that should be ready by late October, before it gets too cold in the mountains where I now live. I suppose Harvest festivals go back to pre-Biblical times, but you do find them in the Jewish festivals in Scripture.

Jenn Jilks said...

I think the joy of the harvest is a wonderful part of all this.

Salty Pumpkin Studio said...

Harvest season is a wonderful time of the year.

♥ Łucja-Maria ♥ said...

A beautiful photo of fresh vegetables and fruits.
Have a great weekend:)

DVArtist said...

This is a wonderful post. I love this time of year. Have a lovely day.

Granny Marigold said...

The cornucopia spilling its colourful contents is a lovely picture. Interesting article too.
I must admit I have never tasted many of the root vegetables mentioned. I suppose not growing up with such makes a big difference. I also appreciated the last post, the one about the Keto diet. My granddaughter is trying to follow it to lose extra weight she carries.
Thanks, Granny Marigold

Granny Marigold said...

I left a comment but I don't think it went through. After I pressed Publish I got an 'error' pop up. Don't know why.

Magaly Guerrero said...

It is very interesting to see how others celebrate the Autumnal Equinox. When I was a child, we used to celebrate by making a feast of what was in season and offering the first serving to The Land. Today, living in New York City with a tiny garden, my family and I still make the feast and share it with those around us. The feast always includes something homegrown...

https://linsartyblobs.blogspot.com said...

I do buy swede sometimes, but I find it very hard to cut up. Enjoy your weekend.

Bill said...

I love harvest season especially in a small community.

Conniecrafter said...

It is the same here, they mostly ask for tinned food instead of fresh for our food banks. So many still in need. Such a wonderful tradition!

Lee said...

I could spend the weekend in front of that overflowing basket of fruit...actually...I do have a a couple of overflowing bowls of fruit...they will do! :)

Lorrie said...

Here in Canada, we celebrate our Thanksgiving, aka Harvest, on the second Monday in October. It used to be that churches would collect food goods for the needy, but now we do so through our food banks.
Our family tradition is to have a dinner on the Sunday of Thanksgiving weekend, with Monday a good day for getting outdoors.

Fun60 said...

Love the photos. When I think of swede I think of all those delicious vegetable soups which are a must this time of the year.

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roughterrain crane said...

Today people can get many varieties of farm products at a supermarket anytime during a year. It could be said you live with less feeling of each season. October is the special month to realize you live in nature.

Divers and Sundry said...

I love the seasonal changes :) Each season has so much to offer.

Teresa said...

Preciosos frutos de otoño. Un beso.