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Sunday, 26 September 2021

'Hold off on retirement and see your cognitive skills persist'

image from here

Postponed retirement slows cognitive decline
Participating in the labour market until the age of 67 slows cognitive decline and is protective against cognitive impairment, study indicates.

Postponing retirement is protective against cognitive decline. The beneficial effect is related to a slowed rate of cognitive decline rather than a boost in cognitive function. That is what a recent study by MPIDR researcher Angelo Lorenti and colleagues found by analysing data from the U.S. Health and Retirement Study.

Participating in the labour market until the age of 67 slows cognitive decline and is protective against cognitive impairment, such as that caused by Alzheimer’s. This protective effect appears to hold regardless of gender and educational or occupational attainment. These findings were recently published in the journal SSM Population Health.

The team of researchers with Jo Mhairi Hale, Maarten J. Bijlsma, and Angelo Lorenti, all affiliated with the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) in Rostock, Germany, used data from the Health and Retirement Study on more than 20,000 US-Americans ages 55 to 75 who participated in the labour market at some point between 1996 and 2014.

There are modifiable life-course predictors of cognitive function
With population aging there is a growing concern about increasing prevalence in Alzheimer’s disease. As there is no cure for Alzheimer’s, it is important to understand the influences on cognitive function over one’s life span, paying particular attention to modifiable risk factors.

“In this study, we approach retirement and cognitive function from the perspective that they both come near the end of a long path of life”, says Angelo Lorenti. "It begins with one's social origins in ethnicity, gender, and early-life social and economic status, goes on with educational and occupational attainment and health behaviours, and goes all the way up to more proximate factors such as partnership status and mental and physical health. All these kinds of factors accumulate and interact over a lifetime to affect both cognitive function and age at retirement."

What are the health consequences of postponing retirement?
“We investigated how demographic change interacts with social and labour market dynamics”, says Angelo Lorenti. In many countries governments have enacted policies to increase the statutory retirement age. That is why it is relevant to understand if retiring at older ages may have health consequences, particularly on cognitive function. “Our study suggests that there may be a fortuitous unintended consequence of postponed retirement”, so Lorenti.

Above words from here
h/t Marks Daily Apple here

Are you thinking about retirement? Are you retired? Do you think it important to keep busy and active? Perhaps keep your mind active, with a hobby, or reading or crossword puzzles?
Do please share your thoughts in the comments.

Dear reader, you will find a variety of articles, studies and recipe ideas within this blog, and not all may be suitable for you. If you may have any food allergies, or underlying health issues please take these into account. If you are a diabetic and not sure how certain foods may affect your blood sugars, test is best, i.e. use your meter.

All the best Jan

35 comments:

My name is Erika. said...

Interesting. I wonder if working longer is equal to (or not) as starting new activities that take up a lot of time during retirement?

Tom said...

...I waited to retire at 71 and it was a good decision.

J C said...

On the news last night, I saw a story about a lady who is still working at age 100! She was...a park ranger??...something like that. She now works remotely, but she is still in the work force. Its awesome. Even working from home is stimulating. If we didnt have contact with the outside world through social media, we would all be declining waaaay down.

DVArtist said...

Great post and so true.

Ananka said...

Retirement age is getting older and older isn't it. I know a few folk who retired and got straight back into voluntary work, they worked 4 or 5 days a week haha! Then sadly have witnessed a few decline after retirement :-( So all in all, work is good for you in some respects.

Jeff said...

While I took a less stressful position last year (at age 63), I do plan to keep working till 70.

Elephant's Child said...

Retirement was forced on me. I do try and keep my mind active. And hope.

J.P. Alexander said...

Muy buena entrada, y si la jubilacion tardia a veces e s una sentencia de muerte. Te mando un beso

Margaret D said...

Interesting.

Valerie-Jael said...

I started lots of activities after retirement, I think it helps against cognitive decline. Valerie

Victor S E Moubarak said...

Certainly something to think about. Good post.

God bless, Jan.

eileeninmd said...

Hello,
I was happy to take my retirement, the commute was awful.
I try to keep my brain active with various activities and especially reading.
Have a happy day and a great new week!

Breathtaking said...

Hello Jan, That's an interesting article,and I have always believed that having a good work ethic is good for you, and keeps body and mind sound. As long as you keep your mind occupied
exercising the brain, even after retirement it may help to keep Alzheimer disease,and depression, at bay.

Hootin' Anni said...

I don't know if I'd agree 100% on this study. Perhaps it would for some, but I know many who have retired at 50 and still function both physically & mentally to a high degree. It depends on the individual.

bill burke said...

An excellent post, thanks for sharing.

judee said...

This makes sense. I retired at age 62 probably before I was ready, but my job was ready to let go of those over 60 with younger teachers. Of course they didn't fire us , just made our responsibilities unreasonable. (private school). Anyway, I did find that being home without a structured schedule or purpose discouraging and I felt kind of lost. So, during Covid I published a book and this summer I have been out selling it. I feel vibrant again ..

Barwitzki said...

Yes, definitely stay busy ... with body and mind - both and cultivating being together with family and friends.
Good Sunday and best regards to you.

CJ Kennedy said...

Interesting

Jeanie said...

When I retired in 2013, I immediately went around to a group of retirees I knew who were living wonderful post-work lives and asked them for their best advice. Long before that, I had made a list of things I wanted to do -- some long put-off tasks, others more expansive (like learn to paint, travel, write, etc.). You have to have something to do or you go nuts and too many don't think of that. It's fine at the beginning to "do nothing" but that gets old. I don't necessarily agree that the retirement age must be later, but for anyone retiring at any age, they should have a plan that involves socialization, goals or things they work upon to live a fulfilling life.

Laura. M said...

Gracias por la informaciĆ³n
Buen domingo pata todos.
Un abrazo.

happyone said...

We are retired and do more work now than we ever did. :)

Buttercup said...

Retired at 63 :) and these have been rich and fulfilling years. Blogging gave me computer challenges and I volunteer for several groups, doing fund-raising and photo work. I rarely have a day where I just "lounge" and even on a quiet day (like during the depth of the pandemic) I was out walking several miles, blogging and reading.

Carla from The River said...

I do not think I will ever "retire".. I love doing stuff. HA!

Thank you for the article.
Carla

Jenn Jilks said...

I think retirement is much more fun. It all depends upon what you do after! I retired when I was 50 and I just had to. Of course, I had 35 weeks with the grandkids this past 18 months.

William Kendall said...

Quite informative.

peppylady (Dora) said...

I can retire anytime after 62. But I plan to go to end of 2023. And than when I turn 64 I plant to retire fully. I plan to be an active retiree.
Coffee is on and stay safe

Bleubeard and Elizabeth said...

I never plan to retire, just change vocations. Nice study, but I wonder what retirees did afterward. That is the big question in my mind. And did they work longer due to economic reasons or love of their jobs? Many in the states MUST work due to economic factors.

Linda said...

I am retired but I have a few hobbies to keep me busy, plus a little bit of volunteer work.

Crafty Green Poet said...

Surely it depends on how you spend your retirement?!

Francisco Manuel Carrajola Oliveira said...

Muito interessante.
Um abraƧo e boa semana.

Andarilhar
Dedais de Francisco e Idalisa
Livros-Autografados

Divers and Sundry said...

The people I talk to who are still working are afraid they'll never be able to afford to retire.

carol l mckenna said...

Contemplative post ~ time is what you make it ~ whenever it is ~ Xo

Living in the moment,

A ShutterBug Explores,
aka (A Creative Harbor)

Debbie said...

retired, kinda...it's a little hard to explain but the hubs and i are very happy!!!

Teresa said...

Muy interesante el estudio. Besos.

Magic Love Crow said...

Very important to keep your mind and body active! Great post! Big Hugs!